Thursday, November 20, 2014

Of Councilman Brad Lander, Pratt Center For Community Development, And The Final Bridging Gowanus Meeting Next Monday

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First Bridging Gowanus meeting, December 2013
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Councilman Brad Lander at first Bridging Gowanus meeting in December 2013
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NYCity proposed rezoning for Gowanus presented to the community in 2008

Almost exactly a year ago, Councilman Brad Lander convened the first public meeting for Bridging Gowanus, "a series of public meetings to develop a neighborhood framework for the infrastructure and land use plan needed for a safe, vibrant and sustainable Gowanus."
The December 2013 meeting was hosted jointly with State Senator Velmanette Montgomery, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez, State Assemblywoman Joan Millman, and Councilmember Steven Levin. To facilitate the conversation about a shared, sustainable vision for the Gowanus, Councilman Lander had hired and paid Pratt Center for Community Development (not to be confused with Pratt Institute) as consultant in charge of running the planning process.

The community came out in force to participate in that first meeting. Subsequent Bridging Gowanus community meetings in March and June 2014 were equally well attended.

According to Councilman Lander, the end result of the process will be "a community supported blueprint for an environmentally safe, vibrant, and sustainable Gowanus to inform the DeBlasio Administration."

The draft community planning framework from the Gowanus Bridging initiative will be presented by our Councilman at a final meeting this coming Monday, November 24 at 6:30, at PS 32  317 Hoyt St, Brooklyn.

Exactly how this final document will be used is questionable. It is doubtful that the community's wishes will make any difference to the De Blasio administration. Bill De Blasio's record as Councilman in our district, which includes Gowanus, is shameful. He supported the spot re-zoning of two large toxic  manufacturing lots adjacent to the Gowanus Canal to mixed-use to allow residential development, and then lobbied against the US EPA Superfund clean-up of the heavily polluted Gowanus Canal.

It is interesting to note that 'Bridging Gowanus' is not the first time the community is asked to envision the future of the neighborhood. Back in 2007, Pratt Center helped convene Gowanus Summit, "a coalition of civic, housing and community development, manufacturing, and labor groups to establish ground rules for development around the Gowanus Canal."
The summit  "aimed to ensure that new development meets the needs of area residents and sets high standards for local quality of life."


The report prepared by Pratt in October 2007 for Gowanus Summit called for:
-Affordable housing: at least 30% of apartments in developments of over 30 units should be permanently affordable to families at a wide range of incomes. On the city-owned site of the former gasworks on Smith Street, 60% of new housing should be affordable.

-Space for industrial jobs must be preserved.

-Responsible contractors and operators are essential on all large projects: employers that treat their workers fairly, create good job opportunities for local residents, deliver quality construction products, and operate quality developments, without unnecessary harm to the community.

-Respect for community context: While allowing for new development and additional density in the canal area, rezoning must limit out-of-scale development in residential sections of Carroll Gardens.

-Promote the mix of uses that make Gowanus special by establishing a special district designed to enable artisans and light industry and artisans to flourish.
Improve the infrastructure and environmental quality of the Canal and the surrounding area, including a comprehensive storm water management plan. New construction should be held to high standards of environmental performance and take measures to reduce sewage overflows.

Shortly afterwards, in May 2008, the New York City Department of City Planning released its Gowanus Canal Corridor Draft Zoning Proposal.  The agency was ready to push the re-zoning through, though there was much opposition in the community.  Most importantly, City Planning obviously had not incorporated much of what  Gowanus Summit had called for.
The re-zoning was eventually put on hold after the EPA declared the Gowanus Canal a Superfund.

Which brings us back to the present.  "Gowanus Summit" has been renamed "Bridging Gowanus." Pratt Center is earning money a second time to create a nice colorful presentation and interpret what they think the community said, and we have a Councilman who is probably using the process so that he will be able to say that he gave local residents a chance to "have a voice." Once again, the City and the developers long ago decided the future of the Gowanus Community.

Make no mistake.  City Planning, this time under Mayor De Blasio,  is probably ready to step out with a full fledged Gowanus Plan. It most probably will be the same one shown to the community in 2008, just with different graphics. We will be told that City planning 'listened to the wishes of local residents" and we will know that it's a lie.

As Councilman Lander is asking us to convene one last time  for Bridging Gowanus, it behooves all of us to come together and to ask him to put his words into action and to give some power back to the community.
We should all demand a process of validation at the end of Bridging Gowanus.  Is the document really a reflection of what the community envisioned at the meetings?  We should be able to vote to make sure of that.

Bridging Gowanus could be the beginning of so much.  It could be a new forward-thinking, true democratic community planning process. Let's see if Councilman Lander, who prides himself on giving power (and a vote) back to the people through Participatory Budgeting, is courageous enough  to give his Gowanus constituents a real voice.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

A Moment In Time: They Came From Red Hook

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They made their way along the Gowanus. 
"We Came from Red Hook,"  one of them responded when asked.



Gowanus Community To Lightstone Group Regarding Gowanus Project: "You Can't Give Us Enough Sympathy For What We Are Going Through"

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Scott Avram,  Lightstone Group Senior Vice President of Development
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Lee Weintraub, Landscape architect for Lightstone Group
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Community Board 6 Manager Craig Hammerman
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Councilmember Brad Lander
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It was standing room only at Mary Star of the Sea's community room last night as Lightstone Group representatives updated local residents on the construction of their mega development at 363-365 Bond Street between Carroll Street and Second Street on the banks of the heavily polluted Gowanus Canal.

The meeting was a small concession to the community, which had to deal with months-long pounding noise and vibration from pile driving during Phase One of the project at 365 Bond Street.   Local residents made numerous calls to local elected officials and to various agencies to point out all kinds of violations at the construction site this past the summer. Many complaints were made to the Department of Health by neighbors who were reporting dizziness and headaches from fumes escaping from the Brownfield site after construction crews disturbed the contamination in the ground.

It is important to note that the NYC Department of Buildings, which had been asked to send representation, did not do so.

As the start of Phase Two at 363 Bond Street is imminent, Lightstone was willing to answer questions from residents and to listen to their complaints last night. But first, the community needed to sit through a presentation.

According to Scott Avram,  Lightstone Senior Vice President of Development, completed work at the 700 unit development site includes:
-environmental Brownfield  remediation at 365 Bond Street under the supervision of NY State Department of Environmental Conservation
-foundation pile driving at 365 Bond Street
-initial foundation work at 365 Bond Street
-Sidewalk bridge and fence installation.

Upcoming work includes:
-remaining foundation work at 365 Bond Street
-Superstructure work at 365 Bond Street
-Brownfield site remediation at 363 Bond Street
-Test piles at 363 Bond Street
-Surveying and layout.

Avram acknowledged that the company had gotten complaints from the community regarding noise and vibration from pile driving, idling trucks at 6 AM in the morning on nearby residential blocks, after- hour and week-end work at the site, and fumes from  petroleum product that was being dug up during the environmental remediation and then trucked through the neighborhood.

"Your many concerns brought forth this meeting, " Avram said.  However,  he was very quick to add that during construction of Phase 1, the surrounding neighborhood had been monitored by an independent third party engineering firm, using air and vibration monitoring devices.
He also pointed out that the Department of Buildings had approved Saturday construction hours from 8 AM to 5 PM.
Avram blamed the early morning idling trucks on third party contractors. He blamed a homeless man living under the scaffolding at Second Street for the pile-up of trash. As for the after-hour work reported by residents, it had been an" isolated, unavoidable incident caused by mechanical issues during a cement pour".  It seemed that the Lightstone representative had an excuse for every inconvenience, problem and violation at the site. 

As for potential  damage to homes adjacent to the building site, one resident expressed dismay with Lightstone's responsiveness.
"We don't trust you in the year you have been building this thing. We have not gotten a straight answer about anything. We have gotten lots of denials, lots of  'oh, its within the limits', 'oh, DoB approved it", or  "it's all according to code", the resident told the developer's representatives.  "We have nothing from Lightstone  that says that you will take responsibility," he added.

Avram's response? "We can just keep our eyes and just build the job.  It's been approved by the Buildings Department. " Later he added: "We don't have to monitor, we don't have to survey.  No one is forcing us.  We are doing the best we can to answer some of your questions.  We are building a big project We are trying to do it quickly.  We are trying to be as unintrusive as possible.  We are building a big building.  We understand that it is loud and noisy."

One Gowanus resident probably expressed the feeling of the community best.  She said: You have taken on a very controversial project. I want to very much appreciate your efforts to address our concerns  You said before that you could just put your head down and not do any monitoring. I just wanted to say that, to me, it's a moral responsibility that you are taking responsibility, that you are looking at these things. And I don't think that you can underestimate how much concern, upset and anxiety this has caused.  I don't think you can give us enough sympathy for what we are going through.  You are going to have your buildings, make your money and cut off the sky.  We are going to be left with the results."

If you live near the Lightstone site and need to report a problem,  please call 311, email Community Board 6 at info@BrooklynCB6.org and call the developer's hotline at 646 362 1500.


Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Tomorrow: DEP To Hold Public Meeting On Superfund Process To Site And Design CSO Retention Tanks

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NYC Department of Environmental Protection is hosting a community meeting tomorrow evening to talk about the Combined Sewer Outflow (CSO) Long Term Control Plan for the Gowanus Canal.
The meeting most likely will focus on the two retention tanks that the US Environmental Protection Agency has mandated as part of the Superfund clean-up.
(More on the CSO tanks here)
This should be interesting.  Please make sure to attend.

On the CSO Long Term Control Plan for the Gowanus Canal
Wednesday, 19 November 2014
Public School 32
317 Hoyt St, Brooklyn, NY 11231
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Doors open at 6:00pm

DEP will give a brief presentation at 6:30 followed by a question and answer session.

When there are heavy rains and the sewer system is at full capacity, a diluted mixture of rain water and sewage, also known as combined sewage, may overflow into local waterways as a combined sewer overflow (CSO). The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is developing a CSO Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) that will identify and evaluate alternatives to improve the water quality of the Gowanus Canal. In addition to developing alternatives through the LTCP process, DEP is currently working with the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Superfund process to site and design CSO retention tanks.
Join us as we seek your input in developing this plan.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED?

Please email ltcp@dep.nyc.gov or call (718) 595-3496. Please share the attached flyer with your friends and colleagues.

For more information on DEP’s CSO program, please visit our LTCP Program website at www.nyc.gov/dep/ltcp or follow us on Facebook: www.Facebook.com /NYCWater.


Monday, November 17, 2014

Today's Heavy Rain Causes Flooding At Lightstone Site On Bond Street In Gowanus

Rendering Of Lightstone Group's 700-unit development at 363-365 Bond Street in Gowanus

Below, photos of this afternoon's flooding at 363-365 Bond Street
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Photos above taken by Carl Teitelbaum

These photos of Bond Street at First Street were taken by Gowanus resident Carl this afternoon after a period of heavy rain.
The building under construction in the photos is 363-365 Bond Street, where Lightstone Group is currently building a 700-unit rental building.
No one in Gowanus will be surprised by the pooling water. After all, the site sits right in a flood zone.
During Hurricane Sandy, it was mostly under water.

Though Lightstone will raise its apartment complex ten feet above the flood level, the photos clearly indicate that heavy rainfall will still cause serious problems.

Local residents have begged local politicians for a hydrological study of the area to understand how new construction will affect older residences near the Lightstone building.

Just a reminder, Lightstone is meeting with the community tomorrow.  I urge everyone to attend.
Here is the meeting information:
Community Meeting Reminder: Lightstone Group To Provide Information On Construction Activity For Mega Gowanus Project



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Community Meeting Reminder: Lightstone Group To Provide Information On Construction Activity For Mega Gowanus Project

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Lightstone Group's construction site at 363-365 Bond Street in Gowanus
Rendering of Lightstone Group's 700 unit rental development in Gowanus

****REMINDER****
Important Community Meeting tomorrow evening

The information above was distributed by Councilmember Brad Lander's office to neighbors of Lightstone Group's massive 700 unit rental development on the shores of the heavily polluted Gowanus Canal.
According to an email sent out by the Councilman's office, the developer "has agreed to host a community meeting before they begin the next phase of construction for their development at 363-365 Bond Street. Neighbors will have the opportunity to hear an update of the project, get a sense of the construction timeline, and ask questions directly to project representatives."

The construction of the first phase of the project at 365 Bond Street between First and Second Street started this past spring and is well on its way at this point. The second phase at 363 Bond Street between Carroll Street and First Street is obviously about to start.

The meeting is no doubt a small concession to the community, which had to deal with months-long pounding noise and vibration from pile driving during phase one of the project at 365 Bond Street. Local residents made numerous calls to local elected officials and to various agencies to point out all kinds of violations at the construction site this past the summer. Many complaints were made to the Department of Health by neighbors who were reporting dizziness and headaches from fumes escaping from the Brownfield site after construction crews disturbed the contamination in the ground.

In response, residents formed Voice Of Gowanus to keep track of all of the 311 calls made and to keep each other informed about information pertaining to the construction project.

Since the site at 363 Bond Street is vastly more polluted as the adjacent site, residents can look forward to more smells and headaches in the near future, as the site is being remediated.

I am urging everyone to attend this meeting. The past problems at the Lightstone site did not only affect the residents immediately across from it. Vibration and noise levels were strong enough to disturb students at PS 58 on Smith Street.

Lightstone Group Information Meeting with Community
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
6:30pm-8:30pm
Mary Star of the Sea – Community Room
41 First Street, Gowanus

***By the way, this is what Nond Street at 363-365 looked like after this afternoon's heavy rains.


EPA Invites Community To Symposium On Superfund Clean-Ups

A Superfund site is "an uncontrolled or abandoned place where hazardous waste is located, possibly affecting local ecosystems or people." New York City now has three such Superfund sites. Gowanus Canal, Newtown Creek and Wolff-Alport have all been listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List (NPL), reserved for the most polluted sites in the country.

On Thursday November 20th at Brooklyn Borough Hall, EPA Region 2 will be hosting a Superfund Symposium to discuss and to give an overview of the clean-up activities at the three sites.

Here is more information:

Come and hear from EPA and community representatives about the cleanup work and how it may impact your commuity. When: Thursday, November 20, 2014 , 6 - 9 PM PM; Where: Brooklyn Borough Hall, 209 Joralemon Street. Hope to see you there!

Live in Brooklyn or Queens? Save the date for our upcoming Superfund Symposium - November 20, from 6-9 p.m.

EPA and community representatives will discuss the cleanup activities at three Superfund sites in New York City: Wolff Alport in Bushwick/Ridgewood, Newtown Creek in Greenpoint/ Williamsburg/ Long Island City/ Maspeth, and the Gowanus Canal in Red Hook/ Carroll Gardens/ Gowanus/ Park Slope.



Brooklyn Borough Hall
COMMUNITY ROOM
209 Joralemon Street, 2nd fl
Brooklyn, NY 11201
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
To rsvp or for general inquiries
please call 212.637.3678



Friday, November 14, 2014

Good Grief! Is THIS What Will Replace The Sweet Wood-Clad Building That Stood At 159 Smith Street?

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Photos above taken of 159 Smith Street in December 2013
Below, the site the way it looks now.
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What will be built in its place?
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Every time I walk down Smith Street past the spot where, until recently,  a charming old wood-clad building stood, I get sad.

The three-story mixed use structure at 159 Smith Street, between Wycoff and Bergen Streets in Boerum Hill, was certainly in need of some attention. However, with its height, ornate cornice and window details, it fit perfectly between its two neighbors.  Most importantly, it had probably stood there for almost a century.

I knew its days were limited when, in late December 2013,  a green construction fence went up and a  NYC's Department of Building  permit for a "proposed 2 story addition to an existing 3 story mixed-use building" was taped to the plywood.
Sure enough, days later, a demo truck pulled up and tore the entire building down, leaving a huge hole.
For months, there was no activity at the site.  Just recently, however, work resumed and a banner with an architectural drawing was hung on the construction fence.

If the drawing is just halfway accurate, we can expect a rather bland 5 story glass box. Obviously, neither the architect nor the owner were going for 'contextual'.

Speaking of owner,  the building belongs to  dentists Bella and Garry Levingart, whose office used to occupy the ground floor of 159 Smith Street.  They relocated to 208 Smith Street shortly before the building was torn down.  They also have an office on Central Park West in Manhattan
Interestingly enough,  Dr. Garry Levingart has some rather negative YELP reviews.  His wife Bella's reviews are even worse.

Can someone please explain to me how a permit for a two story addition would allow the entire building to be taken down?  I know it has something to do with how much of the existing building's foundation is left, but the original structure was razed all the way to the cellar.

What's your thought on the new building?




Thursday, November 13, 2014

Anne Et Valentin: French Eyewear Store Coming To Smith Street Soon

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In recent months, quite a few new and mostly expensive eyewear stores have been popping up in and around the neighborhood. The trend seems to have started with Moscot on Court Street.
Smith Street in particular has attracted some new eyewear stores.  Just a few months ago, See opened at 160 Smith Street, though James Leonard Opticians and Oculus are each just one block away.

Obviously, saturation point has not been reached, because Anne et Valentin, a French eyewear design duo, will be opening a store at 200 Smith Street in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
They began their company thirty years ago in Toulouse.  Today, they have stores in Toulouse, Paris and one on Prince Street in Manhattan and  their designs are distributed worldwide.

From  Anne et Valentin's website:
From day one, rather than trying to adapt the customer to a frame,  Anne and Valentin opt for a deeper comprehension of who their customers are - how they move, live and think - in order to find, for each, the perfect frame,  dedicated to the customer’s unique personality and particularities.

So far all these new eyewear places seem to survive in the neighborhood. Obviously there seems to be growing market for more expensive glasses.

Where have you been shopping for yours lately?



From California To Brooklyn: "We Olive & Wine Bar" To Open On Smith Street

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We Olive, a small California franchise that sells domestic olive oil in addition to balsamic vinegars, tapenades, mustards, and pestos is opening its first outlet on the East Coast.  More precisely, it's moving to Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.
Currently under construction, the new location at 116 Smith Street will also feature a bar that will serve California wines, beers and small plates.

From Brooklyn's We Olive & Wine Bar website:
We Olive and Wine Bar will be opened on Smith St. in the Boerum Hill section of Brooklyn. Boerum Hill is a neighborhood with a small town feel. Streets are still lined with gas-filled lamps and trees. The area has many fine shops and great restaurants that are owned and operated by award winning New York City Chefs. Boerum Hill is a short subway ride from the epicenter of New York City, the borough of Manhattan. Visitors could tour New York City and then return to Boerum Hill to relax in a family oriented neighborhood.

According to the website, the new store/bar will be ready to open this coming summer.

Most recently, 116 Smith Street was occupied by Lunetta, a Mediterranean eatery.



Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Picture Of The Day: Mixer

Spied in the front yard of a house on Carroll Street.


PMFA Reader Photo: Cracker Time

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Reader Andrew took this photo of a squirrel scoring a cracker in Carroll Park a few days ago.
Life seems to be pretty good for this little fellow.
Thanks for sharing, Andrew.



Carroll Gardeners Take Time To Honor Neighborhood Veterans At Moving Ceremony In Carroll Park

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Joan D'Amico, Court Street Merchant's Association
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Vince Mazzone of Court Street Merchants Association
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Councilman Brad Lander
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State Senator Daniel Squadron with his son
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Patrick Watson sings the national anthem
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Rev. Msgr. Guy Massie from Sacret Hearts/ St. Stephen Church on Summit Street.
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This year's Honoree William "Bill" Harris with Joan d'AmicoIMG_1904
William Harris with his wife and son.
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Perhaps you were in Carroll Park this morning for the Veterans Day Ceremony?  If not, here are some photos of the very moving, very solemn occasion.
It is truly wonderful to see how this event has become an important tradition in the past few years.
It is great to see more and more people in the neighborhood taking time to honor our veterans.  And it was nice to see so many kids.
This year's honoree was William Harris.  Joan d'Amico of the Court Street Merchants Association read his  biography:
William "Bill" Harris was born in 1918 in Glasgow, Scotland. At the age of five, his parents and he immigrated to America and settled in Brooklyn on Bergan Street near Smith Street.
In 1940, Bill was drafted into the Army for what was at the time a one year tour-of-duty. While assigned to an artillery unit as a radio operator, he seized the opportunity to go to Aviation Cadet School which would qualify him to be either a navigator, bombardier, or pilot.
Upon completing the course and having now spent two years in the Army, Bill was selected for flight training. In 1943, Lieutenant Harris earned his wings as a pilot in the Army Air Corps and for the next two years was stationed in Italy, flying throughout the Mediterranean, transporting wounded soldiers , military supplies, military personnel and on occasion, civilian personnel performing in USO shows. Most notably  - - -  Bob Hope.
Bill was discharged from active duty in 1945 as a Captain and continued his military career for the next thirty years in the Air Force Reserves until his retirement in 1975 as Major, and to this day, he remains an active member of the American Legion.

The event is organized by Court Street Merchants Association with the help of Friends Of Carroll Park.